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Renovation

Recently I wrote a poem about how my daughter has become afraid of everything. It's been a tough phase for sure. She never wants to be without me. At one or two years old this is a phase everyone understands, but at eight it starts to wear thin. We took it seriously from the get-go. Bringing her to the therapist we love and trust. The one who helped our son through the transition of skipping a grade right into the craziness of middle school. There, she talked it out and left the office practically floating on air. She chatted all the way back to school. She laughed at the silly things that used to make her laugh. Even her teacher noticed her giddiness. Therapy helped in a way my discussions with her did not. It also gave us new language to use. "Your internal alarm is being over-sensitive and you need  to reset it and remind yourself that it's not working right." 

Then my husband and I got another idea. Let's make her room a special place to be! So we put a weekend of love into a renovation. I took my girl to Home Depot to buy the color paint she wanted and a beautiful cream colored carpet. Then we stopped at JoAnn Fabrics. Finally we went to AC Moore for a huge wall decal. When we got home, we went to work. Her father painted the room and put up the decal of a huge tree with hot pink and yellow owls resting in its branches. I sewed owl fabric up the sides to make curtains that would cover the dark of night. We covered the floor with cream colored carpet, put the curtains up and like magic, the room was transformed. Annie did a cartwheel and shouted with joy. It was hard not to feel proud of our work.

Last night was the first night Annie spent the whole night in her room. I think it's working.

Comments

  1. Wow! I'm glad that's working out so well for you and I'm interested in how effective the therapy was. My daughter has Auditory Processing Disorder and sounds have always been a source of anxiety. Night noises are the worst. At twelve she will often end up on our floor. She's been to groups through the school before, but I haven't taken the step of sending her to an individual therapist, but maybe I should.

    I find my Lily is better in the summer without the stress of school, but put any stress on her and we'll find her on the floor again.

    The room sounds beautiful!

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  2. YAY for Annie's new room and YAY for you and your husband helping her through this phase with love and creativity!

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  3. What a supportive family. We all need a little extra help from time to time and it sounds like you are all doing the right things.

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  4. Transforming a room means so much to a child. Their room is their kingdom. I love how you all worked together to make Annie's room special. You got this, girl!

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  5. I'm so happy this worked for you! You're therapist did a wonderful job with her. I'm going to remember this if my kids experience any undo anxiety. Thanks for sharing!

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  6. I'm so glad for Annie, that the extra time with the therapist & then the extra of making her room special sends a message that all is okay, that problems can be alleviated. For young children, knowing that there's hope is important, isn't it? Happy to hear your news!

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  7. How special and how thoughtful of you to make her room the safest and most comfortable place it could be. I hope she loves it.

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  8. Yay for Annie! Everyone needs that space that is theirs and where they can thrive. Here's to much success in that new space.

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  9. Very Nice to have a professional person you know and can trust. It sounds like it was very helpful. We also made our kids room of reflection of who they were and what they needed as they were growing. It seemed to give them a safe haven to return to each day. ( It does mean now that my children are gone my office - my son's old bedroom - is bright red. A bit much for me but the rows of book shelfs tone it down a bit) Congrats and happy changes.

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  10. I am a big believer in therapy - sometimes, our kids just need another grown up voice, one that has to family baggage attached. Your Annie's room sounds lovely - but I am more impressed with her parents, who took the time and effort to make Annie's room all about Annie. No wonder she is feeling great about it again!

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  11. I am a big believer in therapy - sometimes, our kids just need another grown up voice, one that has to family baggage attached. Your Annie's room sounds lovely - but I am more impressed with her parents, who took the time and effort to make Annie's room all about Annie. No wonder she is feeling great about it again!

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  12. Annie is lucky to have such responsive parents and now to have a special retreat created with love and caring. I love the cartwheel and shout of joy--something to make your heart sing, no doubt.

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  13. Annie is lucky to have such responsive parents and now to have a special retreat created with love and caring. I love the cartwheel and shout of joy--something to make your heart sing, no doubt.

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  14. What an inspiring post, Kimberley. Cheers to you and your husband by taking such positive steps to help your daughter through a tough time. Annie's room sounds like it will be a joyous haven for her. Thanks for sharing!

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  15. I always felt like I "should" be able to help my child with everything. BUT, going to a professional for help is so smart. Not just for the obvious benefits, understanding, language and outcomes, but for the lesson you taught your daughter about seeking help. That it is ok, it's what we do, and it works.

    That room sounds like girl heaven! What a great mom and dad your little girl has.

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  16. A little haven created for your child-how special!

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