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Poetry Journaling

It is my pleasure to host this week's Poetry Friday. I encourage you to visit the blogs of those who have posted, read their poetry, and connect with them through your comments.
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Last year I put a bright red hummingbird feeder outside my screened-in front porch. "How will the hummingbirds know how to find it?" my husband asked. I shrugged my shoulders. I was neither a gardener nor a birder yet, but I had my hopes. Not ten minutes after, I heard a rustle and looked up from my journal to find a miracle. A tiny green bird was drinking from my new feeder. I felt like I was watching a fairy slip through a secret door on the side of my house.

A few weeks later, a teacher friend came to observe my classroom. As a gift, she brought me a book of poetry by Kristine O'Connell George. In 26 poems, Hummingbird Nest chronicles a two month period about a hummingbird nest found in a backyard patio. It is like a sneak peek inside someone's journal. I learned about nature, hummingbirds, nesting, and documenting observations.
This book has become an old friend, keeping my miraculous moment fresh each time I open it up. I bring this book out every chance I get. It is a marvelous way to show children and adults how the tightly wound, shortness of structure lends itself well to an entire lifecycle which can occur in just two months. I've also been inspired by this to consider using its structure when I write a poem a day in April this year. Here are two poems from the book: one about the finding of the bird and the next about when her new eggs hatched later on in the following month.



Comments

  1. What a lovely collection! And woo hoo for your hosting this Poetry Friday day!

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  2. Love those hummingbird poems, Kimberley. Kristine's book is new to me and now I must look for it! We've put out feeders for hummers before and it's a thrill to see them.

    This week I'm sharing three chocolate poems for Valentine's Day. My post will go live 6 a.m. Friday morning.

    Thanks so much for hosting!

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  3. This book is so lovely. I love watching hummingbirds. I always forget to put out the feeder. I am so bad about this. I just got Pax in the mail today. I've got to stop for now, but this one goes on my list.

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  4. I'm glad that you are hosting Poetry Friday this week, Kimberly. What a great surprise you had while journaling: "I felt like I was watching a fairy slip through a secret door on the side of my house." I love the screenshots of the poetry book, especially the last one. The hummingbird does look like a beautiful fairy. Today, I am offering a poetryliscious original poem for Laura Shovan's Found Object Poetry Project and a gentle reminder to send in a digital offering for my upcoming gallery, Winter Wanderings.

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  5. Thanks for hosting and for sharing Kristine O'Connell George's hummingbird poems. Watching hummingbirds at the feeder does feel like magic! I'm sharing a little ditty I wrote about ditties this week.

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  6. Hi Kimberly, thanks for hosting and for introducing me to this beeOOtiful book! I have fond memories of those little "pixie tidbits" when I lived in New Mexico. Today I'm also sharing a ditty about ditties... and a secret.

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  7. Reminds me of "Field of Dreams"--"if you build it..." So glad the hummingbirds have come--in the flesh and within the pages of a right-on-time inspirational, gifted book. God bless you! Thanks for hosting and inviting an early start to this Valentine Weekend poetry fest. Every blessing...

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  8. Such a gorgeous book all around ("a glimpse/of pixie tidbit - :0) ) -
    Thanks for sharing, Kimberley, and for hosting this week! (I recently bought PAX as well but haven't read it yet.)
    I'm happy to feature two poems from Irene Latham today, and a fun mini-interview to boot.

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  9. George has written some incredible poetry over the years, and these are two beautifully touching examples. Thanks for sharing - and for hosting! Today I have another original poem inspired by Laura Shovan's Feb. poetry prompt series: http://wp.me/p2DEY3-1qI (link goes live just after midnight EST)

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  10. Thanks for being our hostess! I have illustrated a few of the "found object" poems I wrote for Laura Shovan's month of poems; they're at Random Noodling. And, Kurious Kitty talks about Poetry Out Loud--the NH finals are beginning.

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  11. How wonderful this book looks, Kimberley, and how great to have a hummingbird come to your feeder so fast. I love "a humming of bird". Thanks for hosting before this special weekend. I'm sharing a love poem today.

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  12. We get hummingbirds in our yard sometimes. They are like fairy visitors! I'll have to get this book.

    It's Day 11 of our community write-in about found objects. Linda Baie sent in today's prompt, a doll with a walnut head. http://laurashovan.com/2016/02/2016-found-poem-project-day-11/

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  13. Thanks for hosting, Kimberley. I love HUMMINGBIRD NEST. I'm fascinated by hummingbirds but we rarely see them around here. All my feeder seemed to attract were ants.
    I've added my link, though my post won't go live until after midnight, which is still a few hours away. I share an excerpt from "The Joy of Writing" by Wislawa Szymborska, to go with my post on what I love about writing. http://www.teachingauthors.com/2016/02/the-joy-of-writing.html
    Hope you have a lovely Valentine's weekend.

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  14. Thank you so much for hosting this week. Really appreciate your posting this extra early. :)
    Do note though that your link at the kidlitosphere website is not updated http://kidlitosphere.org/poetry-friday/
    - took quite awhile for me to find your site. :)

    Thank you for sharing Hummingbird Nest - the poems are lovely and am glad they gave you comfort. :)

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  15. Thanks for this memory of summer to help me make it through the rest of winter! And thanks for hosting us!

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  16. What a wonderful story of your first hummingbird, and the poems are a treat. Thanks for hosting, and Happy Valentine's Day!

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  17. I love that you are thinking of using this book's structure for your own writing -- yay! Thank you for hosting today.

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  18. It always surprises me how quickly hummingbirds find the feeders each spring. "If you hang it, they will come!" :-) This looks like a lovely collection! Thanks for hosting.

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  19. What a gorgeous book! It begs to be owned (by me!). Thanks for introducing me to Kristine, O'Connell George. And thanks for hosting today.

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  20. Thank you for sharing the beautiful hummingbird poems. I love watching hummingbirds and see how they could inspire a collection.
    And thanks for hosting!

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  21. Thank you for hosting, Kimberly! Hummingbirds are the best - must have this collection! Have a great Friday! =)

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  22. Thank you for hosting, Kimberley. Today I'm sharing an excerpt from a book-length poem by Charles Darwin's grandfather (in honor of Charles Darwin's birthday today).
    http://missrumphiuseffect.blogspot.com/2016/02/poetry-friday-from-temple-of-nature.html

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  23. Thanks for introducing me to Hummingbird Nest. I immediately went in search of a copy - it looks lovely! Looking forward to sharing it with my daughter. Thanks for hosting!

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  24. "A miracle...a fairy...a secret door..." Beautiful reflections on one of my favorite collections. Thank you for this, Kimberley, and thank you for hosting! xo

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  25. Thank you for hosting today, Kimberely, and for highlighting Hummingbird Nest. What a beautiful book!

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  26. I love your narrative before those beautiful poems! The one about the bird still being in the shape of an egg really touched me! Great job hosting- you inspired me to jump in.

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  27. You're gonna love our site, girl. We gotta plethora lottsa gobbsa poetry on our 22ish blogs. Have at it, dear. Im moe than happy to provide... yet, I myself wanna provide you withe most wonderfull, Kardiak Arrest...

    I actually saw Seventh-Heaven after our accident - far beyond extravagant: if there's only 2 realms after death, dear, and 1 of em aint too cool, which one does that leave us??

    "Those who are wise will shine as brightly as the expanse of the Heavens, and those who have instructed many in uprightousness, as bright as stars for all eternity"
    -Daniel 12:3

    Here's what the prolific, exquisite GODy sed: 'the more you shall honor Me, the more I shall bless you'
    -the Infant Jesus of Prague.

    Go git'm, girl. You're incredible.
    See you Upstairs...
    I won't be joining them in the Abyss.
    Thesuperseedoftime.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete
  28. You're gonna love our site, girl. We gotta plethora lottsa gobbsa poetry on our 22ish blogs. Have at it, dear. Im moe than happy to provide... yet, I myself wanna provide you withe most wonderfull, Kardiak Arrest...

    I actually saw Seventh-Heaven after our accident - far beyond extravagant: if there's only 2 realms after death, dear, and 1 of em aint too cool, which one does that leave us??

    "Those who are wise will shine as brightly as the expanse of the Heavens, and those who have instructed many in uprightousness, as bright as stars for all eternity"
    -Daniel 12:3

    Here's what the prolific, exquisite GODy sed: 'the more you shall honor Me, the more I shall bless you'
    -the Infant Jesus of Prague.

    Go git'm, girl. You're incredible.
    See you Upstairs...
    I won't be joining them in the Abyss.
    Thesuperseedoftime.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete

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