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Talking into Writing

I struggled with what to write this morning. My mind bounced all over the place. A slice of my younger life? A slice of my teaching life? A slice of my parenting life? There are so many slices and the writer must select one just for today. I imagine the choosing is much like “All a sculptor has to do is to take a big block of marble and just chip off all that isn’t necessary for the figure.”  So I have chipped away all that is unnecessary for you to understand today's slice.

"I just have to tell you a story about something, listen if you feel like it..." said my new friend.
"I had a moment of outrage and I need to spend time venting, so I'm coming to you," said another.
"It's going to be a tough day for me today, so I just wanted to check in before I head out," said the third.

Recently three women and I decided to create a Voxer group about our writing. I refer to it as my writing group when my husband asks why my Voxer seems to be ringing all the time. "You must have a lot of writing going on," he says as he rolls his eyes. He doesn't connect the Vox with the writing, methinks. People who aren't writers don't understand the process that is writing. That writing is about pen to paper is only 50% of the process. It's the talking, looking, reading, and thinking that make up the other 50%.

Writing is why we came together and it's why we stay, but it's also this friendship--this community--that has changed my life. I mean that literally. My life is changed. I have a community of very smart, very passionate women friends who care if I write every day. Who worry if I sound sad about something. Who want to know what I think about a subject. It's not that I have no one else to turn to or that I haven't ever had a group of supportive women in my life before, but it just happens to be the perfect chemical combination at the right time. I know what a scientist feels like when her research starts producing the results she's been hoping for. 



My writing is better than its ever been and my voice has a place.

Comments

  1. First of all, your post reminded me that I forgot to charge my phone last night, ha! What a great idea, to form a small writing circle of support. My daughter has done the same with a high school friend; they meet for writing dates and give each other 5 minute writing prompts. I'm not quite at the level to seek that out yet, but am keeping the idea for future reference--thanks!

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  2. Putting pen to paper IS only a part of the process. How exciting for you to have found this "support" group. Michelle Haseltine has been trying to get me into Voxer but I've been holding out. Maybe I need to give it a try. Great slice, Kimberley!

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  3. Kimberly, if this post brings Jennifer Laffin to Voxer consider it quite a HUGE success! This week I've joined two Voxer groups and I have been trying to nudge my writing group into a Voxer group of our own, so I completely understand your passion for it! The last line rings so true, "...my voice has a place." YES!

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  4. I am secretly smiling and looking at my phone. Thanks for writing about us. We have something going that is exciting to all of us. Our "voxes" get longer and longer. Such a great way to connect across the miles. I love that your husband said that. They just don't get it, do they.

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  5. There's nothing like groups that create communities. I've been in a small reading group of 3 for years and even though we don't always read the same book, even though we don't always talk books, we are 3 bonded women sharing our lives. Love them, love all my communities.
    Lucky you to be in a great one too, Kim
    Bonnie

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  6. I'm smiling too. You have put into words, as you often do, exactly what I was thinking. (Isn't that just what writers do?!) The voxer reminds me of our great human need to be social. To talk and talk. The "I"m rambling" comments are our brains processing. What a wonderful world we live in that we can create such human magic!

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  7. So lovely Kim - capturing all of the things that allow the words to come to the page. My list would include walking. Step, step, step, think :-)

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  8. Well, here's the third one smiling. It's been exactly what I needed...in so many ways.

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  9. Well, here's the third one smiling. It's been exactly what I needed...in so many ways.

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  10. Happy for you, and I imagine your group is smiling too. Love "I know what a scientist feels like when her research starts producing the results she's been hoping for. " It all sounds good!

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  11. Enjoyed reading about your group! They sound wonderful.

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