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Mercury: SOL 30

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                                          ______________________________
An old boyfriend told me once that I am mercurial. Few who know me well would disagree. I've learned to accept it's who I am, not a failing so much as a fact. 

My environment changes me regularly. The untidiness of the house can throw my mood out of whack. "Why doesn't anyone pick up around here?" A clean and simple refrigerator can bring me great joy. "Ah, the cheese in the drawer just where it should be when I need it." 

My relationships move me to both ends of the passion spectrum. "Why isn't he answering the PHONE?" I might scream only to turn around to find the cup he took the time to repair after it fell to the floor. "He's the best," I think.

It is this mercurial temperament that pushes people away and pulls them back in--simultaneously. I am a raging eye of the storm deep inside the calm of the seas. A contradiction. An enigma, I guess for some. I stand strong in the faith I have, though, that instead of it being a curse or a fault, my temperament allows me to bend but not break.

Comments

  1. I think a synonym for mercurial is passionate! Maybe because I see myself in this definition of mercurial. I love this about you!

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  2. I like this embracing of self! Well done.

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  3. I had a lot of connections with your post, especially the untidiness of the house where I can not understand how hard it could be to just put the dirty dish in the dishwasher. Being mecurial gives people the nudge to do what they need to do. It's not necessarily a bad thing.

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  4. "Mercurial" sounds so much more magical and mysterious than plain old "flexible". I'm glad you're mercurial; I see it in your posts, and it makes for delightful and thoughtful reading.

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  5. Your slice seems in line with the description of the word...I made connections with frustrations you shared as well. I like the idea of a word to describe you. This could be a mentor text!

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  6. Aren't we all! I kept reading and thinking -- that's just a normal day! When we are true to ourselves, when we express our true selves --there are lots of emotions. Others who can't handle are the ones who need to be more flexible. Passion is passion! Embrace it --if others can't handle it they are not worth it.
    Clare

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  7. Sometimes the intensity of my personality turns other people off. I get you. I'm also very passionate about the things I value and care about! I do think it is a sign of strength.

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  8. And this is what we all love and hate about you. Does that make us mercurial too? When we embrace our true selves, that is maturity. Are you sure you aren't 50 yet? It took me that long to accept I am who I am.

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  9. You are unafraid my friend. You are fascinating. I learn from you every day. Love to you!

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  10. It's a sign of a passionate soul. You cannot apologize for taking this world by storm!

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  11. You are wise to your ways...and the strengths of it.

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  12. You are wise to your ways...and the strengths of it.

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  13. Wow.... just wow! Were you writing about me? I feel that being this way also makes you very passionate. I hear that a lot about what people say I am. I think it's the nice way of saying some of the other things, however we need to look at it like a strength. Those who truly understand and love us, will also look at it this way! Thank you so much for sharing this--- you are strong, passionate, wise and true... true to yourself! :)

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  14. I love Tara's reply.

    I so understand the need for order and how it can affect one's thinking!
    When I have a lot pressing in (like report cards), I will be found cleaning! :0)

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