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Podcasting: SOL 20

Write. Share. Give. Join the March Slice of Life Story Challenge @ Two Writing Teachers
On Sundays I link up with Margaret at Reflections on the Teche to think about #DigiLit
                                                       ______________________________
Today's #DigiLit word is DISCOVERY.

I teach gifted and talented kids. I do not teach a particular subject. My job is to help develop the gifts and talents of the kids we've identified. This is not an easy task. Sometimes gifts are not readily apparent. I can see they think differently, oftentimes this is recorded as "smart" which is really a title given to anyone who catches on quickly. The key to helping these sometimes quirky kids is exposure to many different kinds of thinking, opportunities, and experiences. 

I've been working on podcasting with a small group of five fifth grade boys who are self-professed writing-haters. I don't accept this in anyone. We cannot just hate writing because writing is thinking and we need to process our thinking in order to learn. Writing is one of the absolute best ways to do that processing and it isn't something you're born with. You must work to write your thoughts clearly.

Over the past two months these boys have written 3-4 page scripts about their current interests.

  • Camoflauge
  • Football
  • Nintendo Gaming
  • Remote Control Planes
  • Doctor Who
I haven't had to keep them on task. I asked them to share their scripts via google docs with everyone in the group. We workshopped each piece to (as one of my students told everyone) "make sure no one looked like a Dingus." Then we used Garageband to record their podcast. I had never used Garageband before, but a quick google turned up a Youtube video explanation and a couple of the boys in this group had fooled around with it and knew a few tips that helped us add music, sounds, and clip awkward silences. The podcast below uses Soundcloud to share the .mp4 output from Garageband. This podcast is the first completed one. I am so proud of this boy who was my strongest anti-writer, but became a writing-lover when he realized he could share his passions with a broader audience.


Comments

  1. Wow! There are so many things I love about this post--your determination to guide and support these students in their discovery of the power of writing, your willingness to tackle a new technology, the fabulous podcast, and more! It's clear that no one in this group, teacher or student, "looks like a Dingus!" lol

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  2. You hit it perfectly -- choice of topics and writing for an authentic audience. I think you've turned these writing-haters around.

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  3. I love that your kiddos are creating podcasts! Often my kids make movies, but this might be something they'd like to try. I love that your anti-writers have become writers! Kuddos to you for figuring out a way to make it happen. This is fantastic!

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  4. I love how you have used their interests as a springboard for branching out. Isn't this what all of us prefer to do?

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  5. Such a powerful post!!! I love how you refuse to accept writing-haters! Choice is powerful!!! Way to go!

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  6. Ok, I am over the moon, completely impressed by this whole post! I want to try this! Did you listen to mentor podcasts with them? I don't really listen to any podcasts myself (how do you find them?) and wonder if there are kid ones to use as mentors. Now I could use yours too! Even creating a class podcast with different guest hosts could be fun. How can I learn more about this?

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  7. This is ... awesome ... great use of voice and interest and technology ...
    Kevin

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  8. This should be placed over the doorways of every classroom;

    "We cannot just hate writing because writing is thinking and we need to process our thinking in order to learn. Writing is one of the absolute best ways to do that processing and it isn't something you're born with. You must work to write your thoughts clearly."

    LOVE this Kimberley. The fact that you will not accept it is the essence of you. This is the magic. We are so lucky to have you.

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  9. This is fabulous! I love how you've empowered your kiddos not only to write and take ownership, but also to collaborate. (Also, "...so nobody looks like a Dingus" may or may not have made me laugh out loud.) I love it!

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  10. This is so great! My kids would love to do this. Can you post these on kidblogs so my kids can listen? We can't access blogspot at school. This is exactly what discovery learning should be.

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  11. Thank you for showing me what is possible.

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  12. A teacher-teaching-teachers post! I think what I like most about this is your willingness to do something new to you, and let the students help work out the kinks. Thanks for sharing this with us!

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  13. I can hear the enthusiasm in their voices. What a great way to create audience and purpose for the not-so-enthusiastic writer (at least to start)!

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  14. Wow! How wonderful that you found a way for the boys to connect to their audience and write, write, write!

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  15. What a great idea to get them involved and sounding like they are enjoying what they are working on! I love that you have given them choice and the opportunity to find the love in writing on their own with your direction!! Congrats! I love the idea.

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  16. Kimberley this is brilliant and powerful and wise. I love this idea. Write a book!!!!

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  17. PS Skanny17 is Janet Clare on FB. I feel like Sybil.....but there is a low-tech reason.....not sure my first comment came through so I repeat: this is brilliant, powerful and wise. Awaiting your book eagerly!!!! Wonderful.

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  18. So exciting that they have you!

    Loved this..."five fifth grade boys who are self-professed writing-haters. I don't accept this in anyone. We cannot just hate writing because writing is thinking and we need to process our thinking in order to learn. Writing is one of the absolute best ways to do that processing and it isn't something you're born with. You must work to write your thoughts clearly."

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